Network Security

What is Network Security?

Network security is the any protection of access, misuse, and hacking of files and directories in a computer network system. Some of the most common threats to a network include viruses, worms, spyware, adware and identity theft. One of the most important aspects of network security is the multiple layers of security. There is no single package or system that will offer complete protection against every threat to your network, so it is important to remember to use multiple layers of security for your network.

Many network security threats today are spread over the Internet. The most common include:

  • Viruses, worms, and Trojan horses
  • Spyware and adware
  • Zero-day attacks, also called zero-hour attacks
  • Hacker attacks
  • Denial of service attacks
  • Data interception and theft
  • Identity theft

Thus, Network security consists of the policies and practices adopted to prevent and monitor unauthorized access, misuse, modification, or denial of a computer network and network-accessible resources. Only Network security can protect you from Trojan horse viruses. It involves the authorization of access to data in a network, which is controlled by the network administrator. Users choose or are assigned an ID and password or other authenticating information that allows them access to information and programs within their authority. Network security covers a variety of computer networks, both public and private, that are used in everyday jobs; conducting transactions and communications among businesses, government agencies and individuals. Networks can be private, such as within a company, and others which might be open to public access. Network security is involved in organizations, enterprises, and other types of institutions. It does as its title explains: It secures the network, as well as protecting and overseeing operations being done. The most common and simple way of protecting a network resource is by assigning it a unique name and a corresponding password.

Network security starts with Authentication, commonly with a username and a password. Since this requires just one detail authenticating the user name—i.e., the password—this is sometimes termed one-factor authentication. With two-factor authentication, something the user ‘has’ is also used with three-factor authentication, something the user ‘is’ is also used (e.g., a fingerprint or retinal scan).