Molybdenum Chemical Properties

Molybdenum is a chemical element with the symbol Mo and atomic number 42. It is a silver-gray refractory metal of Group 6 (VIb) of the periodic table, used to impart superior strength to steel and other alloys at high temperature. The metal was first isolated in 1781 by Peter Jacob Hjelm. Its name is derived from the Greek word Molybdos which means lead.

It does not occur naturally as a free metal on Earth; it is found only in various oxidation states in minerals. The free element, a silvery metal with a gray cast, has the sixth-highest melting point of any element. It readily forms hard, stable carbides in alloys, and for this reason most of world production of the element (about 80%) is used in steel alloys, including high-strength alloys and superalloys.

It is an essential trace element in plants; in legumes as a catalyst it assists bacteria in fixing nitrogen. Molybdenum trioxide and sodium molybdate (Na2MoO4) have been used as micronutrients. The largest producers of Mo are China, the United States, Chile, Peru, Mexico, and Canada.

Molybdenum-Element-Properties

Physical Properties

In its pure form, molybdenum is a silvery-grey metal with a Mohs hardness of 5.5 and a standard atomic weight of 95.95 g/mol. It has a melting point of 2,623 °C ; of the naturally occurring elements, only tantalum, osmium, rhenium, tungsten, and carbon have higher melting points. It has one of the lowest coefficients of thermal expansion among commercially used metals.

Chemical Properties of Molybdenum

It is a transition metal with an electronegativity of 2.16 on the Pauling scale. It does not visibly react with oxygen or water at room temperature. Weak oxidation of molybdenum starts at 300 °C; bulk oxidation occurs at temperatures above 600 °C, resulting in molybdenum trioxide. Like many heavier transition metals, molybdenum shows little inclination to form a cation in aqueous solution, although the Mo3+ cation is known under carefully controlled conditions.