Communication Theories

Communication theories says that all living beings whether they are plants, animals, human beings communicate through sound, speech, visible changes, body movements, gestures or in the best possible way to make the others aware of their thoughts, feelings, problems, happiness or any other information.

Communication Theories

Communication Theories

1. Semiotic Theory

John Locke (1690) introduced the term ‘semiotics’ into the English language as a synonym for “doctrine of signs”  semeiotics, to name that branch of medical science concerned with the study of symptoms of disease or ‘natural signs’ in today’s language. Research into sign systems began with the ancient Greeks, and in the course of Western history many writers and scholars have studied the various processes by means of which signification is produced.

In the modern world the major areas which have been the object of semiotic study are literature, environmental and social structures, visual and plastic arts, ritual, myth, pedagogy, and gesture. Consequently, semiotics is very much an interdisciplinary science. Semiotics is the science of communication and sign systems, of the ways people understand phenomena and organize them mentally, and of the ways in which they devise means for transmitting that understanding and for sharing it with others. Although natural and artificial languages are central to semiotics, it covers non-verbal signalling and extends to domains whose communicative dimension is perceived only unconsciously. Knowledge, meaning, intention and action are thus fundamental concepts in the semiotic investigation of phenomena

2. Socio-Psychological Theory

Social Psychology is a branch of Psychology that studies individuals in the social context. It focuses on the individual and also relies on the scientific research to generate the theories of social behaviour. Social Psychology offers a considerable insight into the individual and society, and into the human condition. Social exchange theories differ from economic theories by making predictions about the relationships between persons, and not just the evaluation of goods. Talcott Parsons, a sociologist at Harvard University developed a cybernetic theory of action which was adapted to small group research by Parsons’ student and colleague, Robert Freed Bales, resulting in a body of observational studies of social interaction in groups using Bales’ behaviour coding scheme, Interaction Process Analysis. During his 41-year tenure at Harvard, Bales mentored a distinguished group of sociological social psychologists concerned with group processes and other topics in sociological social psychology.