Vitamin E

Vitamin E was discovered by Herbert M. Evans and his assistant Katherine S. Bishop in 1922. It is a fat soluble vitamin. It is also known as Tocopherols, and Tocotrienols.

Rich source of Vitamin E

  • sunflower seeds
  • egg yolk
  • nuts and seeds (almonds, sunflower seeds, macadamia, hazelnuts, peanuts)
  • dark green leafy vegetables (chard, mustard greens, spinach, turnip greens)
  • avocados
  • peanut butter
  • papaya
  • sweet potatoes
  • wheat
  • soybeans
  • cold-pressed vegetable oils (sunflower, soybean, safflower)
  • wheat germ oil
  • blueberries
  • brown rice
  • dried beans
  • kiwifruit
  • legumes
  • oatmeal
  • organ meats like liver
  • vegetables (tomato, asparagus, bell pepper, broccoli, Brussels sprouts, collard greens, kale, parsley)

Vitamin E uses (Functions)

  • Repairs Damaged Skin
  • Thickens Hair
  • Balances Hormones
  • Improves Vision
  • Helps People with Alzheimer’s Disease
  • Important During Pregnancy for Growth and Development
  • powerful antioxidant that neutralizes the free radicals that cause tissue and cell damage
  • decreases the risk of some cancers such as prostate and bladder cancer
  • slows cellular aging due to oxidation (anti-aging)
  • boosts the body’s immune system function
  • helps protect skin from ultraviolet radiation and sun damage
  • helps in prevention or retard brain decline or neurological diseases such as Alzheimer’s disease
  • helps lower blood pressure and protect against atherosclerosis and heart disease
  • important for red blood cell formation
  • important for fertility and reproduction

Vitamin E deficiency problems

  • loss of appetite
  • nausea
  • anemia due to loss of red blood cells
  • weak immune system
  • eye problems such as cataracts or degeneration of the retina
  • angina (severe chest pains) in males
  • weakness in muscles and limbs and sometimes muscle cramps
  • stiffness or spasms
  • damage to nerves characterized by numbness and tingling or burning sensations in the arms, legs, hands or feet
  • lack of coordination of muscle movements characterized by jerkiness
  • clumsiness or instability
  • digestive tract problems such as liver or gallbladder disorders that result in poor absorption of food miscarriages, uterine or testicular deterioration, decreased fertility