Vitamin B6

Vitamin B6 was discovered by György and colleagues in 1934. It was first isolated by Samuel Lepovsky in 1938. The scientific name of vitamin B6 is Pyridoxine. It is a water-soluble vitamin.

Daily intake of vitamin B6

  • Children 4 –  16 years                      :       6  – 1.0 milligrams
  • Boys 14 –  18 years                           :       2 – 1.3 milligrams
  • Men and women 19 –  50 years     :       3 milligrams
  • Men 51 years and older                    :       7 milligrams
  • Women 51 years and older              :       5 milligrams
  • Pregnant women                               :       9 milligrams
  • Breastfeeding women                       :       2 milligrams

Rich source of Vitamin B6

  • Milk
  • Eggs
  • sunflower seeds
  • garlic
  • whole grains and whole grain products
  • Spinach
  • Bananas
  • Poultry
  • Chickpeas
  • Lentils
  • Pistachio
  • Nuts
  • Yeast
  • Cereals
  • bell peppers
  • potatoes (baked with skin)
  • prune juice
  • raw rice bran
  • turnip greens spinach
  • beans
  • brewer’s yeast
  • chicken
  • fish (cod, halibut, snapper, trout, tuna)
  • lean meat (calf liver, chicken breast, turkey breast, pork loin, beef, venison)
  • turmeric powder
  • cabbage
  • carrots
  • cauliflower
  • peas
  • walnuts
  • wheat germ

Uses (functions) of Vitamin B6

  • Strengthens Immune System
  • important for normal nerve and brain function
  • Treats Emotional Disorders and Relieves Mood Swings
  • Maintains Hormone balance
  • Treats Pregnancy Related Nausea
  • helps to break down fats and carbohydrates to produce energy
  • helps regulate blood sugar levels
  • Boosts Metabolism
  • helps in cell formation and growth
  • promotes healthy skin and mucous membranes
  • needed for hemoglobin and red blood cell formation
  • reduces the risk of heart attack
  • Treats Premenstrual Syndrome
  • Detoxifies the Liver
  • helps treat carpal tunnel syndrome
  • Prevents Cardiac Diseases

 

Vitamin B6 deficiency problems

  • Changes in mood such as irritability, anxiety and depression
  • Confusion
  • Muscle pains
  • Low energy, or fatigue
  • Worsening of PMS symptoms
  • Anemia
  • susceptibility to infections
  • skin rashes (dermatitis)
  • cracks or sores on lips or mouth
  • inflammation of mucous membranes of the mouth or tongue
  • nerve-related problems including convulsions and seizures
  • arm and leg cramps or numbness
  • nausea or dizziness
  • migraine headaches
  • asthma