Vitamin B5

Vitamin B5  was discovered by Roger Williams in 1931. But It was recognized as a vitamin in 1933. The scientific name of Vitamin B5 is Pantothenic acid. Its name was derived from the Greek word panthothen which means “everywhere” because the vitamin was discovered in many different cell types from various organisms. It is a water-soluble vitamin.

Recommended dietary allowance

These are approximate RDA values of Vitamin B5.

Recommended daily intakes for pantothenic acid (vitamin B5) are as follows

Infants 0-6 months           1.7 milligrams

infants 7-12 months          1.8 milligrams

children 1-3 years              2 milligrams

children 4-8 years              3 milligrams

children 9-13 years            4 milligrams

men and women 14 years and older are required 5 milligrams of Pantothenic acid. Pregnant women are required  6 milligrams and breastfeeding women are required 7 milligrams.

Rich source of Vitamin B5

  • Eggs
  • Poultry
  • Meat
  • Liver
  • Milk
  • Tomatoes
  • Peanuts
  • Mushrooms
  • Cauliflower
  • Strawberries
  • sunflower seeds
  • raw rice bran
  • beef
  • sugarcane
  • broccoli
  • avocados
  • brewer’s yeast
  • chicken
  • chard
  • collard greens
  • winter squash
  • yellow corn
  • grapefruit
  • pork
  • salt-water fish
  • shellfish
  • whole grains
  • yogurt

Vitamin B5
 

Functions/uses of Vitamin B5

  • Relieves Stress
  • Healthy Immune System
  • Wound healing
  • Synthesizes of Cholesterol
  • needed for transmission of nerve impulses between nerve cells
  • produces hemoglobin
  • needed to convert carbohydrates, fats, and proteins into energy
  • supports normal functioning of the gastrointestinal tract
  • enables the body to utilize other vitamins and minerals needed for the formation of antibodies

Vitamin B5 deficiency problems

  • Fatigue
  • Insomnia
  • Depression
  • Irritability
  • Vomiting
  • Stomach pains
  • Burning feet
  • Respiratory infections
  • decreased levels of energy, which in turn leads to irritability, depression, apathy and undue fatigue
  • neurological disturbances such as paresthesia (burning feet syndrome), muscle cramps, tingling sensation in the hands, cardiac distress and numbness
  • hypoglycemia
  • decreased serum potassium levels
  • restlessness
  • upper respiratory tract infections
  • Malaise
  • sleep apnea
  • Nausea
  • abdominal cramps
  • decreased immunity, which makes the host body susceptible
  • frequent infections
  • rheumatoid arthritis
  • headaches